In re: Kavanaugh

In re: Kavanaugh
EVIDENCE HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT

In a court of law, evidence refers to the testimony of persons with knowledge of whatever insult or injury is being considered. Circumstantial evidence counts for much less, unless it was collected and processed by an expert witness who uses it to refresh his personal recollection. What was interesting in the matter of Brett Kavanaugh was that the circumstantial evidence (his calendar) he provided apparently did not serve to refresh his memory and so it was discounted, even though it corroborated his accuser’s story. It was a clever strategy to bring forward evidence that could not be used against him, unless he voluntarily admitted his error. Clever of him to hide the evidence in plain sight. Ultimately, his demeanor in the Senate hearing is disqualifying, which is why there are numerous ethics complaints.