Hannah Blog

January 20, 2013

Inequality. Well, duh!

Filed under: Economy,Hannah's views — hannah @ 4:41 am

Joseph Stiglitz has discovered that inequality makes the economy sluggish. Well, duh. What can I say?

Yes, but inequality is the desired goal.

A hierarchical society in which some rule and the majority are ruled is by definition unequal. Superiority presumes inequality. Exceptionalism presumes inequality. Inequality is not a happenstance. It takes a lot of effort to deprive the majority of three hundred million people of the necessities of life without them even noticing that it’s happened until they expire in the prime of life.

That people who survive infancy no longer live as long as they used to do is a tell, but we have to pay attention.

Why are the proponents of the right to life so avid? Because they want people born so they can kill them off. Human husbandry has evolved out of animal husbandry and animal husbandry has evolved out of predation. Instead of killing the prey as soon as it’s spotted, it’s captured and secured to be fattened for slaughter later. How much later depends to a large extent on the compliance of the prey. Those who obey, get to live longer and, very probably, get to experience more torture at the hands of their sadistic owners.

How does it happen that this pattern of behavior goes on almost unnoticed? Money and the law serve as very effective shields, making it relatively easy to convince the victims that everything is arranged via the magic of the market. Of course, the market is where the slaughter is arranged.

“To market, to market to buy a fat pig.” We’re not taking it home to breed.

Equality is the American myth. It glosses over the fact that it is possible for everyone to be equally deprived — long before judgement day, when we are all equally dead.

In the beginning and at the end we are all equal. In the middle, where it counts, equality doesn’t matter to predators taking their pick, some to eat now and others to save for later.

I suspect our mistake is in thinking humans are by nature predatory creatures and the behavior has to be moderated, since it can’t be bred out. This led to a wholesale effort to socialize a population that either didn’t need it, or couldn’t be changed–i.e. almost a total waste. What we should realize is that predatory humans are the result of cognitive deficits, which are probably present at birth, and that these deficits require compensation not very different from what we’d provide for deficits (blindness, deafness, speech impediments) which are less common but easier to notice. Sensory Awareness Deficits (SAD) are what we need to address — on an individual, not a wholesale basis.

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