Emphasis Needed

The Brunswick News reports:

By LARRY HOBBS

Posted on Sep 4, 2015by Larry Hobbs
Glynn County commissioners approved a fourth entry Thursday for the Canal Crossing shopping center, which is being built at the corner of Golden Isles Parkway and Canal Road.

Commission approval was needed because the addition constituted an amendment to the previously-approved development plan for the venture, which will be anchored by a Sam’s Club and include a Hobby Lobby, and restaurants Panda Express and Panera Breads. All four access points to the 40-plus acre shopping center would be along Canal Road.

Some of the project’s neighbors and a concerned citizen complained about the future shopping center’s size and scope, particularly the lack of trees and landscaping preserved in clearing the lot.
St. Simons Island resident Monica Smith said the site plan was first approved in 2009, but more stringent landscape requirements have been implemented to protect open space in development projects since then. She worried also how it might affect the nearby Altamaha Canal.
“You want to get rid of our trees, and you want to turn our Altamaha Canal into a drainage ditch,” she said.
Glynn County Director of Community Development David Hainley said completion of the project will require a 20-foot landscaped buffer to be planted around the center’s border.

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Race

What is the significance of the fact that this four letter word refers to a category into which members of the human species do not fit, as well as an activity that occurs over a specific distance in a specified period of time. Race as a function of time and distance and a referent to non-being. How weird is that? Perhaps it’s a matter of a Germanic root “Rasse,” which is meaningless, being phonetically combined with “rate” simply because it is meaningless. Or perhaps it is a matter of time and distance not being comprehended.
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St Simons Land Trust: “in loco parentis,” paternalistic, or just plain loco?

Once upon a time, not so long ago, before our emancipation at age eighteen was certified by the right to vote, all sorts of adult groups presumed themselves entitled to issue orders and make demands as if they were the parents of all juveniles. That is, they claimed to be acting “in loco parentis,” in place of parents, whose intentions were presumably good and the same. It was not, as I recall, widely questioned that parents are well-intentioned. Perhaps because, in the grand scheme of things, paternalistic adults were actually an improvement over the real thing.
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A Funny Conversation

Yesterday, at the physical therapy facility, I had a funny/telling conversation.

Picture a heavy-set elderly man eating settled on an exercise bike with movable handle bars so all extremities get warmed up. The attendant wonders how he got in wearing that bright yellow LSU shirt in Bulldog country. The fellow responded: “I snuck in by climbing through the bathroom window” a clear signal he likes to chat.

So, as we were both peddling, I observed that “Malaysia had recently banned the color yellow.”

Not sure he got the first word because, after a few beats, he responded with “they’re banning entirely too many things recently.” And then, after a few more beats, he added, “did you hear that Barack Obama has changed the name of Mt. McKinley?” I said, “yes, back to what it used to be. Heritage and all that.”

And he said, “Denali.”

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Thought of the morning.

From the perspective of the capitalist, “disaster capitalism” is not a problem; it’s the ideal.

Of course, to get that, one has to first understand that the capitalist is a virtual cannibal, feasting off his own kind without drawing blood.

Capitalists would have us believe that their predatory behavior is normal and engaging in it virtually or on a symbolic level is an improvement. But that’s because, for some reason, reciprocity has been left out or been removed from their behavioral repertoire.

Reciprocity is a sort of missing link. It is the energy that connects “give and take.” Capitalists can take and they can waste, but they can’t reciprocate, much less pay it forwards.

On the Brunswick, Georgia Waterfront with the incredible brothers Koch

About a quarter century ago, when Hercules Specialty Resins was still spewing its sulfurous emissions across the marshes of Glynn to be dissipated by mingling with the off-shore breezes, local wags dubbed the odiferous environment “the smell of money.” They may have been more right than they thought. For, within a decade, all profits had apparently gone up the chimney, even as every rain storm deposited more toxins to poison the marsh. That profitable enterprise depends to a large extent on avoiding waste is a lesson the new owners of Pinova seem to appreciate. On the other side of town, the tradition of spewing tons of sulphur up the chimney continues.

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Water Hemp


Water-hemp w. needlerush
I’ve been trying to identify all the plants in Hannah’s marsh. This stragly plant has taken over where the soil was disturbed in removing trash and burning deadwood. I suspect it wasn’t much in evidence before because it makes good fodder and the feral deer probably ate it. If the lack of recent predation on the cedars is any indication, it would seem that at present they are finding other things to eat.
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Biden Be Bold

For over a month now, I’ve been tallying the daily Joe Biden stories in the press to follow up on my early prediction that he’d offer himself as a candidate for the presidency. Yesterday’s story was about a planned conference call with the delegates to the Democratic National Committee at their annual meeting.

The call was billed as promoting the agreement with Iran, a signal Obama/Biden Administration achievement. But, as usual, a questioner brought up the looming elections and, perhaps because a reference to personal loss polls well, Biden clung to his indecision for now.

Only CNN has a story up because, it is claimed, their reporters gained access to the call surreptitiously. Regardless, I’m not inclined to provide a link to CNN because the whole context of their site is tawdry. When did the tripe from the super market check-out line take over news sites on the internet?